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Celebrate Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park’s Anniversary

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

October 21st Marks the Anniversary for Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park!

Big enough to be overwhelming, still intimate enough to feel the pulse of time, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park exposes you to some of the steepest cliffs, oldest rock, and craggiest spires in North America. With two million years to work, the Gunnison River, along with the forces of weathering, has sculpted this vertical wilderness of rock, water, and sky.

Located in western Colorado and managed by the National Park Service, the park itself contains the deepest and most dramatic section of the canyon, but the canyon continues upstream into Curecanti National Recreation Area and downstream into Gunnison Gorge National Conservation Area. The Gunnison River drops an average of 34 feet per mile through the entire canyon, making it the 5th steepest mountain descent in North America. By comparison, the Colorado River drops an average of 7.5 feet per mile through the Grand Canyon. The greatest descent of the Gunnison River occurs within the park at Chasm View dropping 240 feet per mile. The Black Canyon is so named because its steepness makes it difficult for sunlight to penetrate into its depths. As a result, the canyon is often shrouded in shadow, causing the rocky walls to appear black. At its narrowest point the canyon is only 40 ft wide at the river.


10 Things To Do at Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

Hiking Trails
Trails for all abilities are available on both South and North Rims. Routes to the river are extremely strenuous due to steep drop offs, loose rock, and prolific poison ivy.

Hiking the Inner Canyon
Extremely strenuous hikes to the bottom of the canyon in steep, unmaintained and unmarked gullies.

Scenic Drives
Gorgeous scenic routes are available along the rims and down to the river.

Fishing
The Gunnison River within Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park is well known for outstanding trout fishing.

Kayaking
This stretch of the Gunnison River is only for the most experienced kayakers.

Rock Climbing
All the climbs in the Black are multi-pitch traditional routes and not for the faint of heart.

Wildlife Watching
Black Canyon provides a unique vertical environment for wildlife.

Horseback Riding
The Deadhorse Trail on the North Rim is the ONLY area open to horses or pack animals for day use/recreational riding in Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park.

Explore the Night
Black Canyon offers night sky viewing opportunities throughout the year.


The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park Poster is an original work by Robert B. Decker and is also part of the Colorado Collection. The poster was created in the style of the Works Program Administration of the 1930s and 1940s, when the Federal Government started the Works Progress Administration (or the Works Program Administration), and commissioned hundreds of artists to create thousands of posters designs from which literally millions of prints were made. At that time, there were only 26 National Parks. And only 14 parks had posters created during the WPA. Black Canyon of the Gunnison was not yet a National Park!

See the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park poster here!

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Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park is home to steaming fumaroles, meadows freckled with wildflowers, clear mountain lakes, and numerous volcanoes. Jagged peaks tell the story of its eruptive past while hot water continues to shape the land. Lassen Volcanic offers opportunities to discover the wonder and mysteries of volcanoes and hot water for visitors willing to explore the undiscovered.

The remarkable hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park include roaring fumaroles (steam and volcanic-gas vents), thumping mud pots, boiling pools, and steaming ground. Water from rain and snow that falls on the highlands of the park feed the hydrothermal system. Once deep underground, the water is heated by a body of hot or molten rock beneath Lassen Peak. Rising hot water boils to form boiling pools and mud pots. Super-heated steam reaches the surface through fractures in the earth to form fumaroles such as those found at Bumpass Hell and Sulphur Works. These features are related to active volcanism and are indications of the ongoing potential for further eruptions from the Lassen “volcanic center.”

Ten Things to See at Lassen Volcanic National Park

Manzanita Lake
An easy trail winds gently around Manzanita Lake and is well shaded by looming Jeffrey pines and bordered by lush willows. You’ll see ducks, geese and the occasional muskrat and beaver. The trail is perhaps best known for its spectacular views of Lassen Peak and Chaos Crags which are best viewed in the morning.

Bumpass Hell
At the largest hydrothermal area in the park via a 3-mile round-trip hike, a boardwalk takes you through a 16-acre bowl of plopping mudpots, bubbling pools, and roaring steam vents – including the super hot Big Boiler.

Little Hot Springs Valley
Located at the bottom of a steep valley, you can view steam vents via the park road with binoculars.

Pilot Pinnacle
Steam vents, boiling pools and mudpots in this area is visible from the park road; “Fart Gulch” is a chalk-colored hillside on the north side of the road near Little Hot Springs Valley. The sulfur smells makes this area easily identifiable.

Sulphur Works
The park’s most easily accessed hydrothermal area features boiling mudpots and steam vents.

Devils Kitchen
A hiking trail in the Warner Valley area leads visitors to this bubbling cauldron. Explore steam vents, mudpots, and boiling pools on a short loop.

Boiling Springs Lake
This bubbling lake has a temperature of around 125 degrees. Mudpots and steam vents line part of the shore and drainage creeks. You must be careful to stay on clearly marked trails in this area as the ground around the lake is unstable and travel in these areas may result in severe injury.

Terminal Geyser
This gigantic steam vent, although not a true geyser, spurts steam from the middle of a creek, and provides a spectacular show!

Cold Boiling Lake
At this quaint lake near Kings Creek, “cold boiling” bubbles rise like soda water.

Loomis Museum
Located next to picturesque Manzanita Lake the historic Loomis Museum offers exhibits, an auditorium which features the park film and a Lassen Association educational bookstore. Exhibits include photos from B.F Loomis who documented Lassen Peak’s most recent eruption cycle and promoted the park’s establishment.


Use the Lassen Volcanic National Park Coupon Code

Remember to use the coupon code LAVO2017 to save 25% AND get the popular “Worth Protecting” sticker with your order!

Worth Protecting Sticker

Click Here for the Lassen Volcanic National Park poster!

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Celebrate Saguaro National Park’s Anniversary, October 14th!

Saguaro National Park Artist Proof

Saguaro National Park is home to the nation’s largest cacti — the giant saguaro — the universal symbol of the American west. These majestic plants, found only in a small portion of the United States, are protected by Saguaro National Park, to the east and west of the modern city of Tucson. Here you have a chance to see these enormous cacti, silhouetted by the beauty of a magnificent desert sunset.

Click here to see the Saguaro National Park Poster.

Saguaro National Park in southern Arizona consists of two distinct areas—the Tucson Mountain District west of the city of Tucson and the Rincon Mountain District east of the city—that preserve Sonoran Desert landscapes and diverse fauna and flora, including the giant saguaro cactus.

The volcanic rocks on the surface of the Tucson Mountain District differ greatly from the surface rocks of the Rincon Mountain District; over the past 30 million years, crustal stretching associated with the Basin and Range displaced rocks from beneath the Tucson Mountains to form the Rincon Mountains. Uplifted, domed, and eroded, the Rincon Mountains remain significantly higher and wetter than the Tucson Mountains, and have plant and animal populations that do not exist in the Tucson Mountain District. The Rincons, one of the Madrean Sky Islands between the southern Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Madre Oriental in Mexico, support high biodiversity.

Earlier residents of and visitors to the lands in and around the park before its creation included the Hohokam, Sobaipuri, Tohono O’odham, Apaches, Spanish explorers, missionaries, miners, homesteaders, and ranchers. In 1933, President Herbert Hoover, using the power of the Antiquities Act, established the original park as Saguaro National Monument. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy added the Tucson Mountain District and renamed the original tract the Rincon Mountain District. Congress combined the Tucson Mountain District and the Rincon Mountain District to form the national park in 1994.

Hiking on the park’s 165 miles of trails and sightseeing along loop drives near the park’s visitor centers are popular activities. Both districts have picnic areas and allow bicycling and horseback riding on selected roads and trails. The Tucson Mountain District forbids overnight camping, but the Rincon Mountain District supports limited wilderness camping. Both districts offer ranger-led walking tours and other educational programs.

Get more details about the Saguaro National Park Poster here.

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Carlsbad Caverns National Park

Carlsbad Caverns National Park

Carlsbad Caverns National Park lies beneath the Guadalupe Mountains and the Chihuahuan Desert of southeastern New Mexico. Carlsbad Caverns includes a large cave chamber — The Big Room — a natural limestone chamber almost 4,000 feet long, 625 feet wide, and 255 feet high at the highest point. It is the fifth largest chamber in North America and the twenty-eighth largest in the world. Carlsbad Caverns is one of over 300 limestone caves in a fossil reef laid down by an inland sea 250 to 280 million years ago — formed when sulfuric acid dissolved limestone leaving behind caverns of all sizes.


A Little History…

Carlsbad-area cowboy, Jim White, explored the cavern with his homemade wire ladder. He named many of the rooms, including the Big Room, New Mexico Room, Kings Palace, Queens Chamber, Papoose Room, and Green Lake Room. He also named many of the cave’s more prominent formations, such as the Totem Pole, Witch’s Finger, Giant Dome, Bottomless Pit, Fairyland, Iceberg Rock, Temple of the Sun, and Rock of Ages.

Until 1932, visitors to Carlsbad Caverns had to walk down a switchback ramp that took them 750 feet below the surface. The walk back up was tiring for some. In 1932 the national park opened up a large visitor center building that contained two elevators that would take visitors in and out of the caverns below. The new center included a cafeteria, waiting room, museum and first aid area.

The park has two historic districts on the National Register of Historic Places – the Cavern Historic District and the Rattlesnake Springs Historic District. The park museum, including the park archives, contains approximately one million cultural resource artifacts that are being preserved and protected.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park’s cultural resources represent a long and varied continuum of human use starting in prehistoric times, and illustrating many adaptations to the Chihuahuan Desert environment. Human activities, including prehistoric and historic American Indian occupations (some of their cooking ring sites and pictographs have been found within the present day boundaries of the park), European exploration and settlement, industrial exploitation, commercial and cavern accessibility development and tourism have left reminders of their presence, and have contributed to the rich and diverse history of the area.

Twelve to fourteen thousand years ago, Native Americans lived in the Guadalupe Mountains. By the 1500s, Spanish explorers were passing through present-day west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. Spain claimed the southwest until 1821 when Mexico revolted and claimed independence. Mexico, fighting the westward expansion of United States in the late 1840s, lost the southwest to the US. In 1850, New Mexico Territory was created, and for the next 30 years the cultural conflict between Native Americans and the US government continued. Eddy, New Mexico, the former name of Carlsbad, was established in 1888 and New Mexico became a state in 1912.


The Flight of the Mexican Free-Tailed Bats

Seventeen species of bats live in Carlsbad Caverns, including a large number of Mexican free-tailed bats. It has been estimated that the population of these bats once numbered in the millions but has declined drastically in modern times. The cause of this decline is unknown but the pesticide DDT is often listed as a primary cause. Many techniques have been used to estimate the bat population in the cave. The most recent and most successful of these attempts involved the use of thermal imaging camera to track and count the bats. A count from 2005 estimated a peak of 793,000. The Mexican free-tailed bats are present from April or May to late October or early November. They emerge in a dense group, corkscrewing upwards and counterclockwise, usually starting around sunset and lasting about three hours.


About the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Poster

The Carlsbad Caverns National Park poster is an original work by Robert Decker and features the iconic Temple of the Sun in the Big Room, nearly 80 stories beneath the surface. The poster measures 13″ x 19″ and is created in the style of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) of the 1930s and 1940s, posters are printed on “Conservation,” a 100% recycled, domestically produced (80 lb.) paper stock with soy-based inks. From start to finish, each poster is 100% American Made.

Click here to see the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Poster

Carlsbad Caverns National Park Artist Proofs are the first 25 posters pulled from each print run. They are numbered 1-25, and are dated and signed. Each print features the color bars used by the pressman to make sure that the print stays registered and colors stay consistent throughout the print run. Carlsbad Caverns National Park posters are 13″ x 20″.

Click here to see the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Artist Proof

Carlsbad Caverns National Park Canvas Prints are printed on superior-quality, artist-grade canvas, designed for museum display and gallery exhibitions. This 350 gsm, acid-free canvas has a tight, natural weave which maximizes image quality, while also revealing the texture of an artist’s canvas. Carlsbad Caverns National Park canvas prints are available in three sizes: 16″ x 24″ 20″ x 30″ and 24″ x 36″, are shipped free and are ready to hang.

Click here to see the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Canvas Print


About the Artist

Photographer and graphic artist Rob Decker studied photography with Ansel Adams in Yosemite National Park during the summer of 1979. The experience solidified his love of photography and our National Parks. Now he is on a journey to photograph and create iconic WPA-style posters of all 59 major national parks as we celebrate the next 100 years of the National Park Service.

“I feel that it’s important to protect America’s special places, and to connect people with nature. And it’s up to all of us to pitch in. Perhaps more importantly, we need to inspire the next generation of park stewards. I’m trying to make a difference by giving back to the amazing organizations that support our National Parks. I donate 10% of annual profits, so when you buy one of these original works, you’re helping these trusts, conservancies and associations, too.”

Learn more about our Giving Back program.

Robert B. Decker retains the sole copyright of the original Carlsbad Caverns National Park poster image. Any unauthorized reproduction violates international copyright law.

Robert B. Decker – Limited Edition Carlsbad Caverns National Park Posters – www.National-Park-Posters.com

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Celebrating the 127th Anniversary of Yosemite National Park

Ansel Adams ion Yosemite National Park
October 1, 2017

In the summer of 1979 — when I was just 19 years old — I had the rare privilege of studying under Ansel Adams in Yosemite National Park. As the years go by, without question, I appreciate that experience more and more.

Yosemite National Park is an amazing “classroom” and we spent time photographing the Valley, the Merced River, as well as up in the high country. But as much as the instruction, I remember some of the social time we had in the evenings with Ansel and his wife Virginia. What an amazing life to have traveled this country — and particularly to our National Parks, and how fortunate he was to see many of these places without the large crowds and restrictions that we have today.

I had been working with black and white film for a solid decade before I began working with Adams’ Zone System, and I would spend another two decades continuing to work in black and white to hone my craft.

At 19, I was pretty awestruck in his presence. I remember scraping together the last bit of cash I had — just enough to buy two of his books at the bookstore in Yosemite; “The Negative” and “The Print” — they seemed like the obvious choices. And then, in a bit more brazened move, I asked him to autograph them! Honestly, to this day, I can’t think of any possession more cherished.

My Ansel Adams Autograph Books

Ansel Adams visited and photographed many of our National Parks — and many places that have become National Parks or are otherwise better protected than they were 100 years ago. And The National Park Poster Project lets me share these incredible places with people from all over the world. Creating the next generation of National Park supporters is something that’s become more and more important to me, and I hope in some small way to contribute to this effort.

One of my goals is to connect with people by producing high-quality artwork that beautifies everyday life. When you buy one of my creations, you also help the trusts, conservancies and associations that support our National Parks. I donate 10% of annual profits to these organizations who use them to raise funds for their ongoing work, and in the past year, I have made financial contributions to:

  • The National Park Foundation
  • The Yosemite Conservancy
  • Washington’s National Park Fund
  • The Glacier Conservancy
  • Friends of Acadia
  • The Western National Parks Association
  • Friends of the Smokies
  • Eastern National
  • The Rocky Mountain Conservancy

In addition, I have been able to donate posters to Yellowstone Forever, Washington’s National Park Fund, the Glacier Conservancy and other groups for their silent auctions to help with their fundraising efforts.

Ansel Adams, who in addition to being an amazing photographer — was also an environmentalist who was realistic about development and the subsequent loss of habitat. Adams advocated for balanced growth, but was pained by the ravages of “progress”. In his autobiography, he stated that, “We all know the tragedy of the dustbowls, the cruel unforgivable erosions of the soil, the depletion of fish or game, and the shrinking of the noble forests. And we know that such catastrophes shrivel the spirit of the people… The wilderness is pushed back, man is everywhere. Solitude, so vital to the individual man, is almost nowhere.”

Ansel Adams first visited Yosemite National Park 101 years ago in 1916. Nearly 50 years would pass before my first visit — the first of many. To this day, Yosemite remains my favorite National Park, not just for the awe-inspiring beauty that is Yosemite, but also for the memories of camping with my family, backpacking the high country with friends, and of course, the summer of 1979 studying under one of the true masters!

The Yosemite National Park poster I have created features what is commonly called the “Tunnel View” — an amazing panoramic view of the Yosemite Valley.

Yosemite National Park

Click here to see the Yosemite National Park Poster

Now, in addition to the standard Yosemite National Park prints, Artist Proofs are available. These are the first 25 prints pulled from the press run once the colors and registration is dialed in. Artist Proofs display the pressman’s color bars, which he uses to ensure colors stay consistent and plates stay registered throughout the print run. Each print displays my “AP” mark signifying it as an Artist Proof and are numbered 1-25. They are also signed and dated.

Yosemite National Park Artist Proof

Click here to see the Yosemite National Park Artist Proofs

And, all of these posters are available as canvas prints — in two sizes — 16″ x 24″ and 24″ x 36″

Yosemite National Park Canvas Print

Click here to see the Yosemite Canvas Print

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100 Days Until Christmas — Are You Kidding Me?

I know it’s still September, but the calendar doesn’t lie, and with just 100 Days Until Christmas, it’s not too early to start thinking about holiday gift ideas!

Here are a couple of ideas for the National Park lover on your list!!!

Artist Proofs

These Limited Edition prints are in High Demand!

Yosemite National Park Artist ProofArtist Proofs are extremely popular and typically sell out quickly — there are only 25 from each print run! I’ve just reprinted several posters for 2017, so there are new Artist Proofs for:

• Yellowstone • Yosemite • Glacier • Grand Canyon • Crater Lake

And, there’s a brand new Artist Proof for:

• Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Click Here to See the Artist Proofs


Worth Protecting Stickers

These will make awesome stocking stuffers!

Worth Protecting StickerThe Worth Protecting sticker is 3″ x 4″ and printed on white polypropylene with a UV laminate. The sticker is based off of the ever-so-popular “Worth Protecting” poster, created in the style of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Stickers can be slapped on outdoor gear, vehicles and more for people to voice their desire to protect America’s National Parks.

Click Here to See the Worth Protecting Stickers


Canvas Prints

Ready-to-hang wall art — now in two sizes (16″ x 24″ and 24″ x 36″)

Yosemite National Park Canvas PrintPrinted on superior-quality, artist-grade canvas, designed for museum display and gallery exhibitions. This 350 gsm, acid-free canvas has a tight, natural weave which maximizes image quality, while also revealing the texture of an artist’s canvas. Canvas prints are available in two sizes: 16″ x 24″ and 24″ x 36″, are shipped free and are ready to hang.

Click Here to See the Canvas Prints


Postcards

4 x 6 Postcard FrameLimited on wall space? Postcards are the perfect solution. Just find a frame for 4″ x 6″ photo prints, and you can make a custom display of your favorite parks!

Postcards are also great for sending to friends, use in PostCrossings, Save the Date or other announcements!

Click Here to See the Postcards


Gift Certificates

Gift CertificateNot sure what to get that special someone? Let them choose! Gift certificates can be used for Posters, Artist Proofs, Canvas Prints, Stickers and Postcards. Gift certificates are a thoughtful, flexible choice. You choose the brand, the recipient chooses the gift. Gift certificates are delivered by email and contain instructions to redeem them at checkout. Our gift certificates have no additional processing fees and never expire.

Click Here to See the Gift Certificates


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Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Golden Gate National Recreation Area

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area was established in 1972 as a new urban park. A timely merging of political, economic, social and environmental forces, occurring in both the Bay Area and the country, paved the way for the creation of the park. Its very existence illustrates the power of the environmental conservation movement in the 1960s and 1970s. Here you can go for a hike, enjoy a vista, have a picnic or learn about the centuries of overlapping history from California’s indigenous cultures, Spanish colonialism, the Mexican Republic, US military expansion and the growth of San Francisco.

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area protects 82,027 acres of ecologically and historically significant landscapes surrounding the San Francisco Bay Area. It has been part of the homelands of Coastal Miwok and Ohlone people for thousands of years and still contains archeological sites and landscapes influenced by native land management. The park’s resources are tremendously varied, ranging from dramatic natural landscapes to cultural and historic landmarks: redwood forests, land protecting endangered species, seaside recreation sites, lighthouses, shipwrecks, former prisons, successful Mexican and early American dairy farms, the U.S. Army’s development of the Bay Area’s expansive seacoast defenses, and elegant early 20th century recreational baths and gardens.

Much of the park is land formerly used by the United States Army. It contains eleven former Army posts whose military architecture and historic landscapes comprise the heart of the park. It encompasses 59 miles of bay and ocean shoreline and has military fortifications that span centuries of California history, from the Spanish conquistadors to Cold War-era Nike missile sites.

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area is managed by the National Park Service and is one of the most visited units of the National Park system in the United States, with more than 15 million visitors a year. The park is also one of the largest urban parks in the world, with a size two-and-a-half times that of the consolidated city and county of San Francisco. It is not one continuous locale, but rather a collection of areas that stretch from southern San Mateo County to northern Marin County, and includes several areas of San Francisco. The park is as diverse as it is expansive; it contains famous tourist attractions such as Muir Woods National Monument, Alcatraz, Fort Point and the Presidio of San Francisco. The Golden Gate National Recreation Area supports 19 distinct ecosystems is also home to 2,000 plant and animal species.


About the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Poster

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area Poster is an original work by Robert Decker and features the iconic Golden Gate Bridge from Baker Beach looking across to the Marin Headlands. The poster measures 13″ x 19″ and is created in the style of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) of the 1930s and 1940s, posters are printed on “Conservation,” a 100% recycled, domestically produced (80 lb.) paper stock with soy-based inks. From start to finish, each poster is 100% American Made.

Click here to see the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Poster

Golden Gate National Recreation Area Artist Proofs are the first 25 posters pulled from each print run. They are numbered 1-25, and are dated and signed. Each print features the color bars used by the pressman to make sure that the print stays registered and colors stay consistent throughout the print run. Golden Gate National Recreation Area posters are 13″ x 20″.

Click here to see the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Artist Proof

Golden Gate National Recreation Area Canvas Prints are printed on superior-quality, artist-grade canvas, designed for museum display and gallery exhibitions. This 350 gsm, acid-free canvas has a tight, natural weave which maximizes image quality, while also revealing the texture of an artist’s canvas. Golden Gate National Recreation Area canvas prints are available in two sizes: 16″ x 24″ 20″ x 30″ and 24″ x 36″, are shipped free and are ready to hang.

Click here to see the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Canvas Print

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Gift Certificates: For Posters, Canvas Prints & More

Gift Certificates

Gift Certificates Might Be the Ultimate Gift!

Gift certificates are a thoughtful, flexible choice. You choose the brand, the recipient chooses the gift. So I’m happy to announce that you can now get National Park Poster gift certificates! Gift certificates are delivered by email and contain instructions to redeem them at checkout. Our gift certificates have no additional processing fees and never expire.

Gift certificates may be the best way to go — because they let people choose what they want — and buy it when they want it. For example, you buy your National Park-loving sister a gift card to the National Park Posters store. She appreciates you knowing what brand she likes – and she appreciates being able to pick out the specific poster she wants.

Gift certificates from National Park can be purchased in ANY amount, and are perfect for Birthdays, Anniversaries, the Holidays, and more, they are easy to purchase…and even easier to use! The recipient just enters the gift certificate number as a coupon code at checkout, and the amount is deducted from the purchase. If the certificate has a greater value, then the balance remains on the card for future purchases!

Here’s all you need to do…

Choose Any Amount

1) Fill in the amount you want to send.

2) Click Add to Cart

3) View Cart

4) Proceed to Checkout

5) On the Checkout Page choose to have the coupons sent to you…or to someone else!

6) If sending as a gift, enter the recipient’s email — and you can enter a custom message.

Please note that coupon codes can not be applied to Gift Certificate purchases at checkout.

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Introducing National Park Canvas Prints

National Park Posters Canvas Prints

National Park Canvas Prints

I’m very excited to announce a new partnership with the premiere canvas print company in the country — Bentley Global Arts — to produce our National Park Canvas Prints. Their impressive client list includes the National Gallery of Art, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Cleveland Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art – New York, Norman Rockwell Museum, the Smithsonian Institution and many others.

Our National Park Canvas Prints are designed for gallery exhibitions and museum display and are printed on superior quality artist-grade canvas. The 350 gsm, acid-free canvas has a tight, natural weave which maximizes image quality, while also revealing the texture of an artist’s canvas. These are NOT canvas transfers. They are Giclée-on-canvas, in which the image is actually printed on the canvas surface with archival inks & substrates. The canvas is expertly hand-stretched around deep (1-1/2″) 100% North American Pine wood stretcher bars with “museum wrapped” white sides. By using industry-leading archival UltraChrome® Giclée inks we can achieve the most vivid and high-definition prints possible.

Continue reading Introducing National Park Canvas Prints

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Spring is a Great Time to Explore Utah’s Five National Parks

The five national parks in Utah draw several million visitors from around the world each year to marvel at surreal scenery and create their own unforgettable experiences. A trip to these parks includes watching the sunrise over the towering depths of Canyonlands National Park, then watching the sunset through Delicate Arch in Arches National Park. You can see ancient petroglyphs in Capitol Reef National Park, then watch a beautiful meteor shower streaks across the Milky Way. Gaze down at coral-hued rock hoodoos in Bryce Canyon National Park or gaze upward at the steep walls of slot canyon trails in Zion National Park. You can hike, river raft, bike, picnic, 4-wheel drive, walk, and even ride a mule to experience these amazing landscapes, their vibrant culture and rich history.

Continue reading Spring is a Great Time to Explore Utah’s Five National Parks

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