Posted on

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Kamokuna

Volcanoes are monuments to Earth’s origin, evidence that its primordial forces are still at work. During a volcanic eruption, we are reminded that our planet is an ever-changing environment whose basic processes are beyond human control. As much as we have altered the face of the Earth to suit our needs, we can only stand in awe before the power of an eruption.

Established in 1916, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park is located in the U.S. state of Hawaii on the island of Hawaii. It encompasses two active volcanoes: Kīlauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes, and Mauna Loa, the world’s most massive shield volcano. The park provides scientists with insights into the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and ongoing studies into the processes of volcanism. For visitors, the park offers dramatic volcanic landscapes as well as glimpses of rare flora and fauna.

Continue reading Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Celebrate Glacier National Park’s Anniversary — May 11th

Going to the Sun Road

Known as the Crown of the Continent, at Glacier National Park you can explore and experience pristine forests, alpine meadows, rugged mountains, spectacular lakes, moraines and glaciers. With over 700 miles of trails, it is a hiker’s paradise for visitors seeking wilderness and solitude. Established in 1910, today you can relive the days of old through historic lodges, chalets, transportation, and stories of Native Americans.

Continue reading Celebrate Glacier National Park’s Anniversary — May 11th

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Dry Tortugas National Park

Lighthouse at Garden Key

Some 70 miles west of Key West Florida, in the Gulf of Mexico, lies one of North America’s most inaccessible national parks. Renowned for pirate legends, shipwrecks, and sheer unspoiled beauty, Dry Tortugas National Park harbors unrivaled coral reefs and marine life, an annual birding spectacle, and majestic Fort Jefferson, the largest masonry stronghold in the Western Hemisphere.

Continue reading Dry Tortugas National Park

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Kings Canyon National Park — Giant Trees, Huge Canyons

Kings Canyon

Kings Canyon National Park and this dramatic landscape, testifies to nature’s size, beauty, and diversity–huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world’s largest trees. Kings Canyon was established in 1940 and incorporated General Grant National Park, which was established in 1890 to protect the General Grant Grove of giant sequoias. The park is north of and contiguous with Sequoia National Park; the two are administered by the National Park Service jointly as the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. They were designated the UNESCO Sequoia-Kings Canyon Biosphere Reserve in 1976.

Continue reading Kings Canyon National Park — Giant Trees, Huge Canyons

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Hot Springs National Park was established on this day in 1921.

Bathhouse Row

Actually, Hot Springs Reservation was initially created by an act of Congress on April 20, 1832 — even before the concept of a national park existed — and was the first time that a piece of land had been set aside by the federal government as an area for recreation. For centuries, the hot spring water was believed to possess medicinal properties — and the subject of legend among several Native American tribes. Following federal protection, the city developed into a successful spa town and has been home to Major League Baseball spring training, illegal gambling, speakeasies and gangsters such as Al Capone, horse racing at Oaklawn Park, the Army and Navy Hospital, and 42nd President Bill Clinton.

Continue reading Hot Springs National Park was established on this day in 1921.

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Celebrate Mount Rainier’s Birthday, March 2nd

Mount Rainier - Reflection Lake

Ascending to 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier stands as an icon in the Washington landscape. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous U.S.A., spawning six major rivers. Subalpine wildflower meadows ring the icy volcano while ancient forest cloaks Mount Rainier’s lower slopes. Wildlife abounds in the park’s ecosystems. Mount Rainier National Park is located in southeast Pierce County and northeast Lewis County in Washington state. It was established on March 2, 1899 as the fifth national park in the United States.

Continue reading Celebrate Mount Rainier’s Birthday, March 2nd

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Yellowstone National Park turns 146 — March 1st!

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone, the first National Park in the U.S. and widely held to be the first national park in the world, was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Straddling the borders of Montana and Wyoming, according the the act, Yellowstone was established “as a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people” and placed it “under exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior.” Prior to the establishment of the National Park Service, the U.S. Army protected Yellowstone between 1886 and 1918 from Fort Yellowstone at Mammoth Hot Springs.

Continue reading Yellowstone National Park turns 146 — March 1st!

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

February 26th is Grand Canyon National Park’s Birthday

Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon — 277 miles long, and up to 18 miles wide reaches a depth of over a mile (6,093 feet) — exposes nearly two billion years of Earth’s geological history as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. The canyon is the result of erosion which exposes one of the most complete geologic columns on the planet and is often considered one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

Continue reading February 26th is Grand Canyon National Park’s Birthday

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Celebrate Grand Teton National Park’s Birthday — February 26th

Grand Teton National Park

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

Continue reading Celebrate Grand Teton National Park’s Birthday — February 26th

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers
Posted on

Acadia National Park’s Birthday is February 26th!

Acadia National Park

Throughout history, people have been drawn to the rugged coast of Maine. Awed by its beauty and diversity, early 20th-century visionaries donated the land that became Acadia National Park, which preserves much of Mount Desert Island, and associated smaller islands off the Atlantic coast.

Landscape architect Charles Eliot is credited with the idea for the park. George B. Dorr, called the “father of Acadia National Park,” along with Eliot’s father Charles W. Eliot (the president of Harvard), helped the park attain federal status when President Woodrow Wilson established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916. On February 26, 1919, it became a national park, with the name Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, an influential French supporter of the American Revolution. The park’s name was changed to Acadia National Park on January 19, 1929, in honor of the former French colony of Acadia which once included Maine.

Acadia is the oldest national park east of the Mississippi River and is home to the tallest mountain on the U.S. Atlantic coast. Visitors come to hike granite peaks, bike historic carriage roads, or relax and enjoy the scenery. The park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails, many of which were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible. The historic carriage road system features 17 stone-faced bridges spanning streams, waterfalls, cliffs, and roadways.

Learn more here: http://www.national-park-posters.com/product/acadia-national-park/

Share this with Friends, Family & Followers