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February 26th is Grand Canyon National Park’s Birthday

Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon — 277 miles long, and up to 18 miles wide reaches a depth of over a mile (6,093 feet) — exposes nearly two billion years of Earth’s geological history as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. The canyon is the result of erosion which exposes one of the most complete geologic columns on the planet and is often considered one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

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Celebrate Grand Teton National Park’s Birthday — February 26th

Grand Teton National Park

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

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Acadia National Park’s Birthday is February 26th!

Acadia National Park

Throughout history, people have been drawn to the rugged coast of Maine. Awed by its beauty and diversity, early 20th-century visionaries donated the land that became Acadia National Park, which preserves much of Mount Desert Island, and associated smaller islands off the Atlantic coast.

Landscape architect Charles Eliot is credited with the idea for the park. George B. Dorr, called the “father of Acadia National Park,” along with Eliot’s father Charles W. Eliot (the president of Harvard), helped the park attain federal status when President Woodrow Wilson established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916. On February 26, 1919, it became a national park, with the name Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, an influential French supporter of the American Revolution. The park’s name was changed to Acadia National Park on January 19, 1929, in honor of the former French colony of Acadia which once included Maine.

Acadia is the oldest national park east of the Mississippi River and is home to the tallest mountain on the U.S. Atlantic coast. Visitors come to hike granite peaks, bike historic carriage roads, or relax and enjoy the scenery. The park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails, many of which were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible. The historic carriage road system features 17 stone-faced bridges spanning streams, waterfalls, cliffs, and roadways.

Learn more here: http://www.national-park-posters.com/product/acadia-national-park/

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February 25th is Bryce Canyon’s 90th Birthday!!!

Bryce Canyon National Park

Hoodoos! Odd-shaped pillars of rock left standing from the forces of erosion — are found on every continent, but Bryce Canyon boasts the largest collection of hoodoos in the world! Despite its name, the major feature of Bryce Canyon is a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southwest Utah featuring thousands of Hoodoos, some up to 200 feet high. Formed by frost weathering and stream erosion, the red, orange, and white colors of the rocks provide spectacular views. In fact, on a clear day, the visibility at Bryce Canyon National Park often exceeds 100 miles! This is due to exceptional air quality, low humidity and high elevation.

The Bryce Canyon area was settled by Mormon pioneers in the 1850s and was named after Ebenezer Bryce, who homesteaded in the area in 1874. The area around Bryce Canyon became a National Monument in 1923 and was designated as a National Park in 1928. The park covers 35,835 acres but sees relatively few visitors compared to Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon, largely due to its remote location.

The park also has a 7.4 magnitude night sky, making it one of the darkest in North America. Stargazers can see 7,500 stars with the naked eye, while in most places fewer than 2,000 can be seen due to light pollution, and in many large cities only a few dozen can be seen.

Along with Bryce Canyon, Acadia National Park, Grand Teton National Park and Grand Canyon National Park have their anniversaries in February.

Now you can SAVE 50% OFF the Bryce Canyon National Park poster — or any National Park Poster — at http://www.national-park-posters.com Just place four or more posters in your cart and use coupon code: BUY2GET2 when you check out!

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As we approach President’s Day…

Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Mount Rushmore National Memorial has become an iconic symbol of the United States, and is visited by nearly three million people each year. They come to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and learn about the birth, growth, development and preservation of the country. From the history of the first inhabitants to the diversity of America today, Mount Rushmore brings visitors face to face with the rich heritage we all share.

Mount Rushmore features 60-foot tall sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington (1732–1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919), and Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865), which are carved into the face of Mount Rushmore, a granite batholith formation in the Black Hills in Keystone, South Dakota.

South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region, ultimately settling on the Mount Rushmore location, which also had the advantage of facing southeast for maximum sun exposure. Robinson wanted it to feature western heroes like Lewis and Clark, Red Cloud, and Buffalo Bill Cody, but Danish-American sculptor Gutzon Borglum thought the sculpture should have a more national focus and chose the four presidents whose likenesses would be carved into the mountain. After securing federal funding through the enthusiastic sponsorship of “Mount Rushmore’s great political patron”, U.S. Senator Peter Norbeck, construction on the memorial began in 1927, and the presidents’ faces were completed between 1934 and 1939.

The figure of Thomas Jefferson was originally started on Washington’s right side. After 18 months of carving the figure of Jefferson had to be blasted off the mountain and restarted on Washington’s left side. Over 90% of Mount Rushmore was carved using dynamite, removing some 450,000 tons of rock from the mountain. Although the initial concept called for each president to be depicted from head to waist, lack of funding forced construction to end in late October 1941. Approximately 400 different people worked at Mount Rushmore during the carving process from October 1927 to October 1941, and although this work was dangerous, no lives were lost.

Mount Rushmore and has appeared in works of fiction, and has been discussed or depicted in other popular works. It was also famously used as the location of the climactic chase scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 movie North by Northwest starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint.

If you haven’t had the chance to see Mount Rushmore, it’s worth the trip! And, you are in close proximity to Wind Cave National Park and Badlands National Park — two very different parks — but both worth visiting!

I’ve created a poster for Mount Rushmore National Memorial as part of the Centennial Collection, which you can see here: https://www.national-park-posters.com/product/mount-rushmore-national-memorial/

There are also posters for my two other South Dakota favorites:

Wind Cave National Park (https://www.national-park-posters.com/product/wind-cave-national-park/)

Wind Cave National Park

Badlands National Park (https://www.national-park-posters.com/product/badlands-national-park/).

Badlands National Park

Click here to learn how you can win the “America the Beautiful” National Park Annual Pass for FREE!

America the Beautiful Annual Park Pass

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Bandelier National Monument Celebrates its 102nd Anniversary

Bandelier National Monument

Bandelier was designated by President Woodrow Wilson as a National Monument on February 11, 1916, and named for Adolph Bandelier, a Swiss-American anthropologist who researched the cultures of the area and supported preservation of the sites.

Bandelier National Monument protects over 33,000 acres of rugged but beautiful canyon and mesa country as well as evidence of a human presence going back over 11,000 years.  Petroglyphs, dwellings carved into the soft rock cliffs, and standing masonry walls pay tribute to the early days of a culture that still survives in the surrounding communities.

Bandelier National Monument, near Los Alamos, New Mexico, protects Ancestral Pueblo archeological sites, a diverse and scenic landscape, and the country’s largest National Park Service Civilian Conservation Corps National Landmark District.

Over 70% of the Monument is wilderness, with over one mile elevation change, from about 5,000 feet along the Rio Grande to over 10,000 feet at the peak of Cerro Grande on the rim of the Valles Caldera, providing for a wide range of life zones and wildlife habitats. There are three miles of road, and more than 70 miles of hiking trails.

The park infrastructure was developed in the 1930s by crews of the Civilian Conservation Corps and is a National Historic Landmark for its well-preserved architecture. The National Park Service cooperates with surrounding Pueblos, other federal agencies, and state agencies to manage the park.

Learn how you can get this limited edition, WPA-style print. Click Here!