Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Mount Rushmore National Memorial

$30.00

Title: “Mount Rushmore National Memorial”

Artist: Robert B. Decker

Size: 13″ x 19″

Paper: “Conservation” 100% recycled, domestically produced

Inks: Soy based

Artist Proofs also available: $55.00

All prints are Numbered, Signed & Dated

The Artist's signature on these prints attests that he has personally inspected, numbered and approved and signed each print and further verifies that no unsigned or unnumbered copies within the limited edition are known to exist.

SKU: moru Categories: ,

Product Description

The Mount Rushmore National Memorial Poster is an original work created, numbered, signed and dated by the artist. The original photograph was taken by Robert Decker. The poster is created in the style of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), when the Federal Government — in the 1930s and 1940s — commissioned hundreds of artists to create thousands of poster designs for public exhibits, community activities, theatrical productions, health, safety and educational programs, nature and travel. By the end of the WPA era, only 26 National Parks had been established and only 14 parks had posters created for them.

Photographer and graphic artist, Rob Decker, studied photography with Ansel Adams in the summer of 1979 in Yosemite National Park, an experience that solidified his love of photography and our National Parks. Now he is on a journey to photograph and create iconic WPA-style posters of all 59 major national parks in time for the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016.

The sole copyright of the original image is retained by the Artist, Robert B. Decker. Any unauthorized reproduction is a violation of international copyright law.

Robert B. Decker – Limited Edition National Park Posters – www.National-Park-Posters.com

About Mount Rushmore and the Mount Rushmore National Park Poster

Mount Rushmore National Memorial has become an iconic symbol of the United States, and is visited by nearly three million people each year. They come to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and learn about the birth, growth, development and preservation of the country. From the history of the first inhabitants to the diversity of America today, Mount Rushmore brings visitors face to face with the rich heritage we all share.

The Mount Rushmore National Park poster features the Avenue of Flags in the foreground and the 60-foot tall sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington (1732–1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919), and Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865), which are carved into the face of Mount Rushmore, a granite batholith formation in the Black Hills in Keystone, South Dakota.

South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region, ultimately settling on the Mount Rushmore location, which also had the advantage of facing southeast for maximum sun exposure. Robinson wanted it to feature western heroes like Lewis and Clark, Red Cloud, and Buffalo Bill Cody, but Danish-American sculptor Gutzon Borglum thought the sculpture should have a more national focus and chose the four presidents whose likenesses would be carved into the mountain. After securing federal funding through the enthusiastic sponsorship of “Mount Rushmore’s great political patron”, U.S. Senator Peter Norbeck, construction on the memorial began in 1927, and the presidents’ faces were completed between 1934 and 1939.

The figure of Thomas Jefferson was originally started on Washington’s right side. After 18 months of carving the figure of Jefferson had to be blasted off the mountain and restarted on Washington’s left side. Over 90% of Mount Rushmore was carved using dynamite, removing some 450,000 tons of rock from the mountain. Although the initial concept called for each president to be depicted from head to waist, lack of funding forced construction to end in late October 1941. Approximately 400 different people worked at Mount Rushmore during the carving process from October 1927 to October 1941, and although this work was dangerous, no lives were lost.

Mount Rushmore has appeared in works of fiction, and has been discussed or depicted in other popular works. It was also famously used as the location of the climactic chase scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 movie North by Northwest starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint.

If you haven’t had the chance to see Mount Rushmore, it’s worth the trip! And, you are in close proximity to Wind Cave National Park and Badlands National Park — two very different parks — but both worth visiting!

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