Big Bend National Park & Guadalupe Mountains National Park Posters Released!

Two new posters — one for Big Bend National Park, the other for Guadalupe Mountains National Park — were just released this week. The two parks, both in Texas feature dramatic landscapes, amazing views, and remote wilderness of the American West!

Big Bend National Park

Big Bend National ParkBig Bend National Park is located in a remote part of Southern Texas and borders Mexico along the Rio Grande. It has national significance as the largest protected area of Chihuahuan Desert topography and ecology in the United States. It contains more than 1,200 species of plants, more than 450 species of birds, 56 species of reptiles, and 75 species of mammals. The Rio Grande corridor is also a migration highway for many species passing through the desert. Elevation contrast create varied microclimates that further enhance the diversity of plant and animal life.

The national park covers 801,163 acres and is home to an abundant variety of Cretaceous and Cenozoic fossil organisms, and the park has artifacts estimated to be 9,000 years old. Historic buildings and landscapes offer graphic illustration of life along the international border in the 19th century.

For more than 1,000 miles, the Rio Grande/Río Bravo forms the boundary between Mexico and the United States, and Big Bend National Park administers approximately 118 miles along that boundary. The park was named after a large bend in the river and Texas—Mexico border. One of the park’s best known features is Santa Elena Canyon. Split by the Rio Grande, on one side, the United States; the other, Mexico.

Because the Rio Grande serves as an international boundary, the park faces unusual constraints while administering and enforcing park rules, regulations, and policies. In accordance with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the park’s territory extends only to the center of the deepest river channel as the river flowed in 1848. The rest of the land south of that channel, and the river, lies within Mexican territory. The park is bordered by the protected areas of Parque Nacional Cañon de Santa Elena and Maderas del Carmen in Mexico.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Guadalupe Mountains National ParkGuadalupe Mountains National Park is situated in the Guadalupe Mountains of West Texas and preserves the rugged spirit and remote wilderness of the American West. Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,749 feet and El Capitan, were long used as a landmark by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. The Guadalupe Peak Trail offers perhaps the most outstanding views in the park. Climbing over 3,000 feet to the summit of Guadalupe Peak, the trail winds through pinyon pine and Douglas-fir forests and offers spectacular views of El Capitan and the vast Chihuahuan Desert.

The park covers 86,367 acres and is in the same mountain range as Carlsbad Caverns National Park which is located about 25 miles to the north in New Mexico. The Guadalupe Mountains are among the best examples of a marine fossil reef, which formed 260-270 million years ago. Eventually, the sea evaporated and as the reef subsided it was entombed for millions of years until a mountain-building uplift exposed part of it.

Numerous well-established trails exist in the park for hiking and horse-riding. Visitors can see the ruins of an old stagecoach station near the Pine Springs Visitor Center. Camping is available at the Pine Springs Campground and Dog Canyon. The restored Frijole Ranch House is now a small museum of local ranching history and is the trailhead for Smith Spring. The park also contains McKittrick Canyon. A trail in the canyon leads to a stone cabin built in the early 1930s, formerly the vacation home of Wallace Pratt, a petroleum geologist who donated the land in order to establish the park.

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It’s National Park Week!!!

Each spring, the National Park Service invites everyone to join in on America’s largest celebration of national heritage. National Park Week is April 15th – 23rd, and you can bypass the entrance fee at 400-plus national parks on the weekends of National Park Week — April 15-16 and April 22-23. National Park Week is about making great connections, exploring amazing places, discovering open spaces, enjoying affordable vacations, and experiencing America’s best idea — our national parks! From diverse wildlife and iconic landscapes, to vibrant culture and rich history, our National Park System has something for everyone.

What Better Way to Celebrate National Park Week than with these great deals!

PICK 4 PARKS

Use Coupon Code: PICK4PARKS at checkout and GET FOUR POSTERS FOR $89.00.


PICK 5 PARKS

Use Coupon Code: PICK5PARKS at checkout and GET FIVE POSTERS FOR $99.00


PICK 6 PARKS

Use Coupon Code: PICK6PARKS at checkout and GET SIX POSTERS FOR $109.00



But that’s not all! You’ll also get this map of America’s National Parks absolutely free with your order! This 13″ x 19″ poster features the names and locations of the 59 major national parks. I think of it as the ultimate bucket list!!!

And, I’ll automatically upgrade your shipping to USPS Priority Mail and ship it in a flat mailer! This is an $8.95 value, but more importantly, it’s a perfect place to safeguard your posters until your ready to frame them.

America's National Parks Map

Check out these three great ways to save…and get free stuff!

  • FIRST >>> SAVE BIG on EVERY POSTER, COLLECTION or ARTIST PROOF
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  • THIRD >>> FREE EXPEDITED SHIPPING UPGRADE

NOTE: Remember to use one of these special Coupon Codes when you place your order. Coupon codes are only valid through the end of National Parks Week (and the free map only while supplies last!), and can only be used for Single Posters, Collections and Artist Proofs (postcards are excluded).

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Hot Springs National Park was established on this day in 1921.

Actually, Hot Springs Reservation was initially created by an act of Congress on April 20, 1832 — even before the concept of a national park existed — and was the first time that a piece of land had been set aside by the federal government as an area for recreation. For centuries, the hot spring water was believed to possess medicinal properties — and the subject of legend among several Native American tribes. Following federal protection, the city developed into a successful spa town and has been home to Major League Baseball spring training, illegal gambling, speakeasies and gangsters such as Al Capone, horse racing at Oaklawn Park, the Army and Navy Hospital, and 42nd President Bill Clinton.

The park includes portions of downtown Hot Springs, making it one of the most accessible national parks (nearly 1.5 million visitors in 2015). Bathing in spring water is available in approved facilities and the entire Bathhouse Row area is designated as a National Historic Landmark District. It contains the grandest collection of bathhouses of its kind in North America, including many outstanding examples of Gilded Age architecture. The row’s Fordyce Bathhouse serves as the park’s visitor center and Buckstaff and Quapaw still operate as bathhouses.

I’ll be traveling to Hot Springs National Park this month, kicking off a flurry of trips to National Parks as I begin to work on the next round of WPA-style National Park Posters!

I’ll also be heading to Washington, DC, at the end of the month — hoping to time the peak bloom of the cherry blossoms — and have been offered a chance for a behind-the-scenes tour of the Museum Resource Center in Landover, MD, where all the archeological collections from the National Capital Region are stored. Sounds a bit like “National Treasure” — I’m stoked!

Click here for more info: http:/www.national-park-posters.com

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Kings Canyon National Park — Giant Trees, Huge Canyons

Kings Canyon National Park and this dramatic landscape, testifies to nature’s size, beauty, and diversity–huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world’s largest trees. Kings Canyon was established in 1940 and incorporated General Grant National Park, which was established in 1890 to protect the General Grant Grove of giant sequoias. The park is north of and contiguous with Sequoia National Park; the two are administered by the National Park Service jointly as the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. They were designated the UNESCO Sequoia-Kings Canyon Biosphere Reserve in 1976.

Kings Canyon National Park

Humans have inhabited the area for thousands of years. The first Native Americans in the area were Paiute peoples, who moved into the region from their ancestral home east of Mono Lake. The Paiute Nation people used deer and other small animals for food, as well as acorns. They created trade routes that extended down the eastern slope of the Sierra into the Owens Valley.

Kings Canyon had been known to white settlers since the mid-19th century, but it was not until John Muir first visited in 1873 that the canyon began receiving attention. Muir was delighted at the canyon’s similarity to Yosemite Valley, as it reinforced his theory regarding the origin of both valleys, which, though competing with Josiah Whitney’s then-accepted theory that the spectacular mountain valleys were formed by earthquake action, Muir’s theory later proved correct: that both valleys were carved by massive glaciers during the last Ice Age.

Then United States Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes fought to create the Kings Canyon National Park. He hired Ansel Adams to photograph and document this among other parks, in great part leading to the passage of the bill in March 1940. The bill combined the General Grant Grove with the backcountry beyond Zumwalt Meadow.

Kings Canyon’s future was in doubt for nearly fifty years. Some wanted to build a dam at the western end of the valley, while others wanted to preserve it as a park. The debate was settled in 1965, when the valley, along with Tehipite Valley, was added to the park.

Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, Isle Royale National Park, Hot Springs National Park, and Kings Canyon National Park, celebrate their anniversaries in March.

Now you can SAVE 25% OFF the Kings Canyon National Park poster — or any National Park Poster — at www.national-park-posters.com Just use coupon code: NPS2017 when you check out!

Photographer and graphic artist, Rob Decker, studied photography with Ansel Adams in the summer of 1979 in Yosemite National Park, an experience that solidified his love of photography and our National Parks. Now he is on a journey to photograph and create iconic WPA-style posters of all 59 major national parks as we celebrate the next 100 years of the National Park Service.

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Celebrate Hot Springs National Park & Historic Bathhouse Row

Actually, Hot Springs Reservation was initially created by an act of Congress on April 20, 1832 — even before the concept of a national park existed — and was the first time that a piece of land had been set aside by the federal government as an area for recreation. For centuries, the hot spring water was believed to possess medicinal properties — and the subject of legend among several Native American tribes.

hot-springs-620

Following federal protection, the city developed into a successful spa town and has been home to Major League Baseball spring training, illegal gambling, speakeasies and gangsters such as Al Capone, horse racing at Oaklawn Park, the Army and Navy Hospital, and 42nd President Bill Clinton.

The park includes portions of downtown Hot Springs, making it one of the most accessible national parks (more than 1.5 million visitors in 2016). Bathing in spring water is available in approved facilities and the entire Bathhouse Row area is designated as a National Historic Landmark District. It contains the grandest collection of bathhouses of its kind in North America, including many outstanding examples of Gilded Age architecture. The row’s Fordyce Bathhouse serves as the park’s visitor center and Buckstaff and Quapaw still operate as bathhouses.

Along with Hot Springs National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rainier National Park and Kings Canyon National Park also celebrate their anniversaries in March.

Now you can SAVE 25% OFF the Hot Springs National Park poster — or any National Park Poster — at http://www.national-park-posters.com Just use coupon code: NPS2017 when you check out!

Sign Up for the National Park Poster Project Newsletter and get all the latest deals and information!

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Introducing the Artist Proof Series

Original Artist Proofs are the first 20 posters pulled from the print run. They feature the color bars used by the pressman to make sure colors stay registered and consistent. These Limited Editions are available for each National Park...but are in short supply. Click now to learn more!

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Celebrate the 100th Anniversary

The Worth Protecting Poster is a Limited Edition that celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service (1916-2016) and America's National Parks. It's based on a WPA-era poster centered around the idea that America's Best Idea is Worth Protecting!

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